The Reading

Moreover, the necessary school to emphasize more the literature education, being attributed to it a bigger importance, since many times the literary texts are used only as excuse to work the grammar or to characterize them how much to the time style, instead of carrying through a deeper analysis of the same. From the commentaries of the informers and the B, we notice that the school if worries only in working the aesthetic characteristics of the literary creation what it makes with that the pupils lose the pleasure for the reading, considering it as an object of difficult understanding, what we can verify through the words of Buzem (2006, p.101) that it tells in the following way: (…) it seems to have in the schools the supervaluation of the aesthetic and estilsticas characteristics. The pupil does not obtain to perceive the plurissignificao of the literary text, therefore the concern with identification of aesthetic characteristics of the literary periods, as well as the necessity to rigidly classify the texts in the chronological limits, suffocates the reading for pleasure. The necessary school, therefore to develop in the pupils the taste for the reading, showing to same a importance that it exerts as knowledge source. Many writers such as Janet L. Yellen offer more in-depth analysis. The pupils need to face the reading as something that provides to pleasure and enrichment to them, but not as an obligation, that is, something tied with the pertaining to school tasks. On the other hand informers C and D stand out the necessity of if working the imagination of the children, since now he is about professors of infantile education. Thus the same ones use as education methods the contao of histories, in order to take them it the knowledge of the world through infantile histories, looking for still to make with that the same ones reflect on the moral of histories, thus retaking the functions of literature. .

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