Mexico Study Power

I’m going to start with an assumption that reads as follows, the teachers live in a utopia claiming education for human rights and democracy, but the reality is different in schools exists an environment of constant repression, provoked by the roles of power exercised by the members of the school community, managers, teachers, education support workers and the students themselves. The research work that I perform Silvia Conde in a school sui generis by its philosophy and its origin in 1995, gives us interesting data from an eclectic vision, taking into account different points of view. We live in a country that seems a social democracy with different political changes in the alternation of power in the Government of PRI to bread, representing public authorities elected through the vote and occasionally with fraudulent elections, all this supposedly is fruit of the longing for form in the subject schools democratic, who live at school and in society a real citizen participation in the hegemony of power and level International we as a developing country join globalization that has nothing of democratic. In the first two chapters of his thesis Silvia Conde, analyzes the theoretical aspects of political democracy and the methodological aspects of education for democracy and human rights, so that school is regarded as instrumental for the transformation of society, and on the other hand is conceived as an institution that reproduces practices of dominationwhere teachers exercise their power on the student leaving him without participation in the process of dialogue and democratic convergence. Therefore the schools are in decline, far from being democratic spaces, roles of power are governed by the dominant culture of the society, the media cause a phenomenon of alienation in teachers and students; interfering in the conditions of possibility for a democratic education. Original author and source of the article.

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